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Become an iCAMH volunteer in a low or middle income country

What:

IACAPAP is looking for junior and senior child and adolescent psychiatrists willing to give up 4-7 days of their time to teach child and adolescent mental health (CAMH) in a low resource country.

Why:

Child and adolescent mental health problems are common, serious and treatable. However, the gap between those needing care and those receiving it is huge, particularly in low resource settings. Thanks to IACAPAP and WHO initiatives, this is beginning to change and slowly (child) mental health problems are being addressed in more parts of the world (mhGAP, IACAPAP textbook and MOOC, MSc programmes etc.). While the few often relatively newly qualified (child) mental health professionals in these settings are busy addressing clinical needs and building up services, there remains a lack of experienced clinical teachers and trainers. In high income countries, on the other hand experienced child psychiatrists as well as junior psychiatrists and trainees may want to support their colleagues. They also realise that experiencing mental health care in lower income countries and going back to basics can be a truly inspiring experience.

Who is being trained:

The training is aimed at highly qualified 2nd line professionals able to act as multipliers and supervisors to others: these are initially pediatricians and general psychiatrists (and their residents) with some prior knowledge of CAMH (e.g. having passed the MOOC).

Who are we looking for?

Senior trainer: You are open minded and adventurous, have minimally five years experience as a consultant child and adolescent psychiatrist and some teaching experience. You are willing to give 4-7 days of your time in order to teach (and learn!) in a low resource country.

Junior trainer: You are a final year trainee or a newly qualified child and adolescent psychiatrist looking for a unique educational opportunity, willing to give up 4-7 days of your time assisting the senior trainer in teaching (and learning!) in a low resource setting. Apart from assisting with teaching you will be responsible for the course evaluation. You may use and publish the results in collaboration with your host and IACAPAP.

How?

You apply to become a junior or senior trainer, by sending the application form and your cv to IACAPAP. We match you to a host, who meets the requirements. You communicate directly with the host about details of your visit. You receive all training/evaluation materials for the course from IACAPAP and if possible participate at a “train the trainer” workshop at one of our conferences.

And the costs?

The host is responsible to look after you during your stay – from the moment you land to your departure (except any additional tourist activities). We encourage hosting with a colleague rather than in an anonymous and expensive hotel, as this will promote professional links, cultural exchange and mutual understanding.

IACAPAP is seeking funds to assist with costs for flights and visas, but there might be some personal contribution required from the trainers (or their employers?). IACAPAP will provide you with a certificate acknowledging your service as a volunteer trainer, which you might be able to use for your CPD and/or your tax return.

Here are the application forms. Please plan early and be aware that it might take considerable time to match you to a host. Once a host has been found planning may take a further 6-9 months:

I have been a qualified child or adolescent psychiatrist for more than five years and have teaching experience. I would like to volunteer as an iCAMH Senior Trainer

I am a qualified child- and adolescent psychiatrist or senior trainee with less than 5 years experience and/or a child psychiatrist without teaching experience


Dr Daniel Fung is married to Joyce and the father of 5 grown up children. He is currently the Chairman Medical Board of Singapore’s Institute of Mental Health since 2011. Dr Fung is an Adjunct Associate Professor at all 3 medical schools in Singapore.

Dr Fung is currently the President of the International Association for Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Allied Professions. He was awarded the National Day (Public Service Administration (Bronze)) Award in 2017 and the National Medical Excellence Award (Team) in 2018 for his work on community and school based mental health.

Dr Fung is interested in the treatment of emotional and behavioural disorders in children and he has advocated for the development of child mental health services and strategies through his research

Dr Fung’s research is supported by the National Medical Research Council and other agencies. He has co-authored over 160 peer reviewed research papers (118), books (32) and book chapters(18).


Dr. Christina Schwenck is professor for Special Needs Educational and Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology at the University of Giessen, Germany. She is a trained child and adolescent psychotherapist (specification behavior therapy) and a trained supervisor. Her research interests comprise selective mutism, conduct disorder, and children of parents with mental illness. She has published 56 articles in peer-reviewed journals and several book chapters on childhood mental health. She is editor of three book series on child and adolescent psychotherapy, psychology in school and psychotherapeutic children´s books. In her free time, she follows her passion for photography around the globe.

Dr. Schwenck is currently the Secretary General of the International Association for Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Allied Professions (IACAPAP). Her vision is to strengthen training and promotion of child and adolescent mental health professionals, particularly in low- and middle-income countries, including long-term mentorships for early career scientists and clinicians in this important field. Furthermore, she aims at alluring allied professions for IACAPAP to enhance active collaboration between professions in order to provide optimal supply for children and adolescents with mental health problems.